Skip to main content

Honors College Co-Curricular Workshops

Complete your honors project successfully through this workshop series. This will help students build research, writing, and presentation skills.

Pearl Growing

Use the handout given to you at the start of the workshop to follow along.

1. Define what a primary source is in each subject area and give examples.

2. Write down your focused research topic/question. Discuss with a peer related topics that you need to explore. Create an outline, mind map, or storyboard to make the connections between the concepts.

3. Jot down the keywords, synonyms, and/or related terms for your major concepts. 

4. Using CAPOW as the foundations, identify element(s) that you should make a conscious effort to evaluate for your subject-specific research.

5.  Pick a database (below) that is relevant to your topic and find at least one article. Use your keywords to create a Boolean search strategy. Find at least one article relevant to your research and add the appropriate information to your research log.

Loading

Beyond the Truthiness: Information as a Conversation

"And that brings us to tonight's word: Truthiness. Now I'm sure some of the word-police, the "wordanistas" over at Webster’s, are gonna say, "Hey, that's not a word!" Well, anybody who knows me knows that I am no fan of dictionaries or reference books. They're elitist. Constantly telling us what is or isn't true, what did or didn't happen...”

– Stephen Colbert, October 17, 2005, The Colbert Report

Currency

  • What is the publication date or last date updated?
  • Is the content timely, useful, and valid for your information need?

Authorship

  • Who wrote the content?
  • What makes that individual author or organization qualified to write it? What other information about the author is included?
  • Who sponsored the content?

Purpose

  • Is the purpose of the content to inform, to entertain, or to promote a product or service? 
  • Who is the intended audience?
  • Does the information seem credible? If so, can you check the information against another resource (i.e. book, journal article, newspaper, etc.) for credibility?

Objectivity

  • Is content biased?
  • Are opinions balanced or does the author have an agenda?
  • How does the bias influence the information?

Writing Style

 

 

 

  • Does the information contain a bibliography, references, or a comprehensive list of sources supporting its theme, topic, or agenda?
  • Is content presented at an appropriate level for an academic research paper?
  • Does the supporting information fit your research need?
  • Is the work complete, or is it a summary of other work?
  •  

Lee, Samantha and Shana Lebowitz. "20 cognitive biases that bcrew up your decisions." Business Insider, 26 Aug. 2015, 12:38, www.businessinsider.com/cognitive-biases-that-affect-decisions-2015-8.

"How to Spot Fake News." IFLA, 13 Feb. 2017, www.ifla.org/publications/node/11174.

Loading

© 2015 LSC-Kingwood Library | Ask Us: Kingwood.LRC-Ref@LoneStar.edu | Reference: 281.312.1693 | Circulation: 281.312.1691 | 20000 Kingwood Drive, Kingwood, TX 77339